Pacing

This won’t necessarily fit in with the official version of what pacing is, but it’s how I’ve come to see and understand the idea/technique.

Quick-Notes:

  1. Pacing is a technique that helps people manage their ME/CFS
  2. It’s about finding balance, and doing what you can when you can
  3. Most of the work has to be done by the sufferer, although there are ways other people can help, and there are professionals who can offer advice and assistance
  4. It’s an ongoing process to manage the condition, not a quick fix, not a cure

How to describe pacing? Pacing is (in theory) like becoming an adult: you have to accept things are different than before and that you’re not finished learning, become responsible for your own actions and decisions, be aware of yourself and what you’re doing, understand that actions have consequences, and on occasion be prepared to bargain & compromise. It’s also alike in that while guidelines and advice can be given, it’s up to the individual to work out how best to apply the concept to their own life.

Acceptance. This is sort of the first step, because if you don’t accept you have this condition – that you can’t carry on like you used to and that there will be unexpected ups and downs – then you’re not going to be able to get on with adapting and learning how to manage it. Unfortunately that’s where the advice ends: you have to work out how to come to terms with having ME/CFS for yourself.

Learning. As with any condition, there are many new things you’re going to have to learn. There are general practicalities: what the condition is, how it affects you, what potential treatments are, what your triggers, warning signs and limits are, how to deal with physical symptoms and what lifestyle changes these may necessitate. There are more personal considerations: how your character will help/hinder you, dealing with related emotional issues, telling family and friends and coping with their reactions, ditto for strangers. It doesn’t end there either, because if you have the condition for a long time your symptoms may alter, either in severity or type.

Responsibility. Although there will be people offering advice and support, you have to take responsibility for finding out what works for you, because there’s no checklist or or set of rules for ME/CFS. What works for one person may not work for another. It’s up to you to try things or not, to find out information, to implement suggestions, to keep going. It’s also only right (and means you’re a nice person) if you accept responsibility in another way – don’t blame other people when you suffer a set-back. If you went in to work, went out with friends, stayed up a bit later, that was your decision. Because everyone knows. . .

Actions have consequences.

Bargain & compromise. This can be a dicey business, but if you have a line-up of things you really want to do, you may decide (or may have to) implement these options. For example, you have a part-time job Monday, Tuesday, Friday. It’s your friend’s birthday and they want you to come out at the weekend. You always go out with your mum on Thursday. You know you’ve already been overdoing it a bit recently and there’s that bug going round the office. What do you do? Ignore your warning signs and do it all? You end up near-enough housebound for two weeks at least. Your other options? A) choose one or two activities which are the most important and excuse yourself from the rest. B) take it one day at a time, doing whatever is planned but taking it as easy as possible and being ready to call a halt if you get worse. C) decide you’ll do x even though you know you’ll probably suffer for it, leave y early, and rearrange z for another time.

Awareness. You have to become aware of how you’re feeling because no-one else can do that for you. Only you can know if you’re feeling run-down, and you have to be strong enough to follow through on that knowledge – if you think you’ve had enough say so, do something about it, stick to your decision. (Unless you really start feeling better or decide it’s worth the risk)

Honesty is also an important element of pacing. You need to be honest with yourself and others about how you’re feeling: don’t pretend nothing’s wrong if it is, because you’ll suffer in the end; but when you can do things – even little things – then do so because it will probably make you and the people around you feel better, more positive.

Google’s definition of ‘pace’ is to: walk at a steady speed, especially without a particular destination and as an expression of anxiety or annoyance. Well what you want with ME/CFS is to keep on at a steady maintainable speed, and setting goals might not be the best idea to achieve that. (Although that also depends on your personality and what the goals are I guess) The anxiety and annoyance you get for free, and will make themselves known without any say-so from you!

In the end pacing is about balance – you can’t do everything you used to, but if you take care you can shave off the major lows you have probably been suffering and establish a new ‘normal’. For the technique to be most effective it should become a way of life, almost instinctive. You sense your warning signs and heed them, and you don’t deliberately do more than you know you can handle unless you’re willing to accept the consequences. . . In other words, you do what you can when you can.

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