Book-view: ‘Living with M.E.’

Title: Living with M.E.: the chronic/post-viral fatigue syndromeProduct Details

Author: Dr Charles Shepherd

(Image from Amazon. Click here to view)

 

‘Living with ME’, as you might guess from the title, is all about ME/CFS. There are four parts to this book:

  1. What is ME/CFS (definition, history, causes, symptoms, quality of life and recovery, current research)
  2. Practical steps toward coping (dealing with doctors, drug treatments, self-help, mind and body, alternative and complementary approaches)
  3. Learning to live with ME (3 case histories, relationships, jobs, your home, increasing mobility, help and benefits available in Britain)
  4. Appendices (useful names and addresses, further sources of information)

In the blurb on Amazon it is described as ‘A well-researched, comprehensive guide, LIVING WITH M.E. is THE book to buy for any M.E. sufferer who wants information not speculation‘. Certainly as I read it I was going – that is so true. I have that! I never realised that might be connected to having ME/CFS. I wish I’d read this years ago. . . There were also bits that I skimmed or missed out entirely either because they weren’t so relevant to me or I wanted to read other bits more.

What’s almost as interesting as what’s inside the book is the divided opinions it seems to stir up. (Check out the reviews on Amazon!)

A lot of the condemnation levelled seems to relate to 4 points:

  1. Information is out of date. The publication date may be 1999, but the book can be found on the MEA website so presumably has their approval. If that’s not good enough for you then (to put it bluntly) don’t buy it. Also, from what I’ve read, although lots of studies are ongoing there hasn’t been any great change between the majority of what’s in this book and current provable information. Admittedly I did only skim-read some chapters.
  2. Conflicting/confusing advice. Consider: no-one knows what causes this condition, there are a huge range of symptoms, and there are no definite cures or treatments for ME/CFS precisely because what works for some people doesn’t work for others. Is it surprising then that Dr Shepherd doesn’t say ‘do this and you’ll improve’? He gives you information and lets you make up your own mind.
  3. Information is wrong. A serious statement if true and since this book matches information I’ve seen from other sources. . .
  4. It’s discouraging and depressing. I’d say realistic and honest personally. The book does not dispute that people get better. It encourages you to have hope, keep trying, and have a positive attitude toward getting well. What it doesn’t do is give false hope and declare that because one person (even several people) got better this way it means that everyone can.

I got a second hand copy of this book and must admit I was somewhat daunted when I saw the size of it. (512 pages) But, because the information is so clearly divided into sections as well as chapters, and there’s a decent index at the back, you can find what you’re looking for quickly and easily, and you don’t have to read the bits you’re not interested in. If you want to go straight to treatments then do so. If the science of the condition hurts your head (it does go a bit technical in places) skim it, or skip it altogether. Simple.

Because no definite ‘this is so, do this’ advice is given, this may be more of a challenging read than other books on the topic. But surely that proves the information given is thorough, reasonably balanced and genuine? For example, when dealing with alternative and complementary therapies (a large section I feel I should point out) both what the therapy is to treat and potential side-affects are given, then sometimes the author’s opinion on whether this treatment is worth trying.

The book makes you think – here’s the positive, here’s the negative, and have you thought about this?

It’s true, if you want inspirational stories then this probably isn’t the book for you, but if you want facts and useful advice, then this is a decent place to look.

Note: Dr Shepherd is medical adviser to the ME Association, and suffers from ME/CFS himself.

 

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