Book-view: Fighting Fatigue

Title: Fighting Fatigue: a practical guide to managing the symptoms of CFS/ME

Edited by: Sue Pemberton & Catherine Berry

(Image from Amazon. Click here to view)

 

 

The authors of this book are various, their occupations including occupational therapist, physiotherapist, and nurse. The introduction reveals that the information is based on ME/CFS booklets developed over many years at the Leeds and West Yorkshire CFS/ME Service, and includes stories by sufferers. There is little to no information in this book about the medical side of the condition: it doesn’t go into the potential causes or treatments, and no symptoms are discussed beyond that of fatigue.

In the introduction it states that,

“. . . This book is designed to be a useful tool in your recovery. It gives straightforward and specific advice on managing different aspects of everyday life. . .”

There are eleven chapters:

  1. Managing your daily activity and energy
  2. Rest
  3. Sleep
  4. Diet
  5. Stress and relaxation
  6. Thoughts and feelings
  7. Memory and concentration
  8. Dealing with others
  9. Physical activity and exercise
  10. Relapse and setbacks
  11. Carers

Each chapter includes an introduction, information broken into manageable chunks, worksheets and activities to help implement their advice, and a ‘story’.

The advice given seems sensible and practical, and they way it’s given makes it reasonable to implement. The difficulty comes when you try to make the changes and stick to to them, because some of them involve a fair amount of commitment and– I want to say hard work. It’s hard work as in you have to be truthful with yourself, prepared to keep trying even if you get it a bit wrong at first, and committed enough to keep it up beyond the first weeks, months, years. . .

I think one of the best points about this book is that it encourages you to try, to not be too hard on yourself and to set achievable goals, while also reminding that a step back isn’t the end of the world. In other words it’s motivational without being too ‘everything’s sunshine and rainbows’ or giving false hope. It even mentions at one point that staying as you are would probably be easier, because making an improvement will involve commitment and hard work, and will at times be frustrating.

Although I have come across many of the ideas in one form or another over the years, (so it wasn’t especially useful for me) I can see it being extremely useful for others: it seems a good book for strategies that help you cope with fatigue, and may not only manage your symptoms but help you work to improve them.

Finally, I didn’t get a feeling of being preached at as you do in some medical/self-help books, and there was no jargon or complicated diagrams. Instead the general tone is of calm, easy friendliness – someone who’s had more experience than you offering a bit of advice. Many of the techniques are of the ‘simple in theory, hard in practice’ kind, but surely worth giving a go.

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