Book-View: Diagnosis and Treatment of CFS

Title: Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Written by: Dr. Sarah Myhill

(Image from Amazon. Click here to view)

 

 

First off I need to clarify that I read the first edition of this book (shown above) however there is now a second edition which has a blue cover and includes ‘Myalgic Encephalitis’ in the title. All comments will be relating to that first edition as (astonishingly) I don’t know what changes and revisions have been made in the second.

The byline for this book is, ‘. . . It’s mitochondria, not hypochondria.’ This, with the title, pretty much tells you what the book is about: how to identify and treat cases of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). The layout is:

  • Acknowledgements, message, introduction
  • Chapter 1: The clinical picture of CFS (symptoms and diagnosis including tests worth doing and those not)
  • Chapter 2: Mitochondria and CFS (what mitochondria are, how they work, how they go wrong and what that means)
  • Chapter 3: Treat the mitochondrial metabolic dyslexia
  • Chapter 4: Solid foundations for recovery and good health (rest and pacing, vitamins and minerals, sleep, diet, allergy, detoxification, the fermenting gut)
  • Chapter 5: Other important bits of the car to look after (avoiding viral infections, hormonal disturbances, oxygen supply, psychological aspects, exercise)
  • Chapter 6: Toxic and viral causes of CFS
  • Chapter 7: The practical details – where to start (the order of importance, possibility of getting worse, how long will recovery take)
  • Chapter 8: Catastrophe Theory and CFS
  • Resources, glossary, index

As you can see from this it seems to cover most of the issues people would be interested in: it outlines a theory for the cause of CFS, (that malfunctioning mitochondria are ultimately responsible) possible tests that will detect this, and a series of steps that will eventually result in your recovery. In other words it’s authoritative, positive, and offers definite instructions. And with a plausible sounding theory and some reasonable recommendations, it’s something I can see a lot of people wanting to read more of.

But–

These are theories, not proven methods. Plus, the tests and nutritional supplements recommended are sourced through Dr Myhill’s clinic, and I’m not sure they’re available elsewhere.

I must admit I felt uneasy before I’d finished the first chapter of this book, and that feeling grew as I read on. The trouble was that, as mentioned, none of this is proven even though there are statements like, “This test is nearly always abnormal in CFS sufferers.” (Chapter 1, pg 17) If this were true, wouldn’t someone else have noticed by now, given the number of studies underway? Researchers would surely jump on something that could give a halfway reliable test for CFS.

My conclusion: either the results aren’t so definitive or these tests are hideously expensive.

Then there’s the fact that several suggestions for treatment involve things already tested and found to have inconsistent results. Vitamin B12 injections, for example, or taking truckloads of vitamins and minerals. This book gives the impression that there’s no harm to be found in taking well over the RDA for various vitamins and doing so long term, however a documentary I watched the other day warned of the dangers of this very thing. Overdosing on some vitamins is simply wasteful, doing so with others can be potentially harmful.

Also, if you’ve already ‘laid your foundations’ by improving sleep and diet, and by implementing pacing, (all of which you can do for free using a bit of common sense) you’re probably going to start improving without the need for taking extra nutritional supplements.

Another thing about this book was how difficult I found reading it, and this wasn’t brain-fog related! It was because there’s a lot of science in there, so much so that after the first couple of doses I started skimming pages until it finished, hoping I wouldn’t miss too much. The chapters are very long too, and there is a fair amount of repetition. I also got very confused (and curious) at the mention of taking ‘hypnotics’. . . They turned out to be sleeping pills.

This may be more my personal opinion than an overview of the book – I try to be impartial but sometimes that isn’t so easy. I want to believe in a cure or at least a treatment for ME/CFS, but I’m not going to grab at vines growing golden thorns, and I feel a need to speak out when I see one.

I’m not saying that the theory is completely wrong – the idea of mitochondria malfunctioning sounds reasonable. It’s more the suggestions made for recovery that worry me. For example, apart from the vitamins and minerals already mentioned, I believe decent sleep, pacing and rest, and having a good diet are important factors in managing CFS, if not the most important. I’m just not convinced that how this book suggests achieving those things is the best way.

I don’t mean to criticise Dr Myhill, and I’m not saying she doesn’t help people. This is my opinion of this book, and maybe some of these issues have been addressed in the second edition.

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