Mindfulness

I said a while back I was going to do something on mindfulness, and it’s taken this long because I hit a few hold-ups along the way. First computer issues, then health issues, and then there’s just so much stuff out there about mindfulness, and some of it is. . . not contradictory exactly, but it seems to have become a bit like yoga: some of it has become ‘popularised’, and then there are a lot of different methods. This being the case, I fell back on a few go-to sites.

The NHS has a page on mindfulness (here) which gives a basic description as well as links to find out more. It describes mindfulness as “knowing directly what is going on inside and outside ourselves, moment by moment.” In other words it means being aware of yourself and the world around you, and taking time to notice both. The idea is that mindfulness encourages an appreciation and enjoyment the world. It can also help with stress and depression both through the fostered connection between person and environment, and by helping people to notice the signs of stress or depression and deal with them.

In addition to the general introduction – which is one of the clearest and most reasonable I’ve seen for mindfulness – I really liked that toward the end there was this comment:

“Mindfulness isn’t the answer to everything, and it’s important that our enthusiasm doesn’t run ahead of the evidence,”

My next visit was to Wikipedia, which had the same basic definition: mindfulness is a process by which people focus their awareness on internal and external experiences taking place in the present moment. It had a lot more on the psychological aspects, its origins and links to Buddhism, and how it can be used in different settings. It added that clinical studies have come up with results suggesting there are both physical and mental health benefits to practising mindfulness, and it be of benefit to healthy people as well as those with various medical conditions.

The final site I visited was Be Mindful, which had something of the same definition but presented in a way that instantly put me off. (Don’t ask me why because I don’t know, but a lot of the mindfulness stuff just makes me want to cringe/laugh, then run away while wishing desperately never to hear anyone talk about it ever again) Be Mindful advocates the use of mindfulness techniques as tools to manage your wellbeing and mental health. This includes its use to alleviate stress, anxiety, and depression by helping people manage difficult experiences and situations. There is information on evidence and research, finding a teacher, learning online, and FAQ’s. They also do an online stress test.

The two most common link-ins with mindfulness are meditation and yoga, I guess because both of these skills promote taking a bit of time out of a hectic day to slow down and breathe. And there’s the whole self-awareness and breathing techniques aspect.

I’m not going to go into any of this any further right now because a) I don’t want to bore anyone not interested even if those people stopped reading after the title, b) I’m sure most people reading this blog are more than capable of typing in a search term and finding these things for themselves, and c) I don’t see much point in merely repeating information that’s already out there.

As always, let me know if I’m wrong!

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